NOAA Fixes Solar Calculator

When comparing the results of the KosherJava NOAA algorithm to the output of NOAA’s new Solar Calculator almost two years ago, a discrepancy was encountered between the two. There was no discrepancy compared to the output of the old NOAA calculator. The NOAA code is an implementation of the accurate Jean Meeus algorithm for solar time calculations, and the KosherJava code is a Java port of this algorithm. While attempting to debug the issue, I turned to Pinny Markowitz who ported the KosherJava library to both Ruby and Python. He was able to trace the issue to what seemed to be a small accuracy adjustment missing in the noon calculation on the new NOAA implementation. Based on Pinny’s analysis, the old implementation seemed correct, but without confirmation from the NOAA developers this was not a certainty. We reported the issue to NOAA for clarification, and after an almost two-year delay, the NOAA development team confirmed and corrected the bug. After NOAA’s fix there is no longer any discrepancy. The fix can be seen in line 342 of the NOAA JavaScript file, where a half day adjustment is made in the noon time calculation. This bug was never present in the KosherJava library, or other language ports of the KosherJava code, since our code was based on the original NOAA code.

Zmanim API 2.3.0 Released


The KosherJava Zmanim API version 2.3.0 was released on Dec 7th, 2021 ג׳ טבת תשפ״ב in Maven and GitHub. While there have been numerous releases over the years, this is the first release-related post since the v1.3.0 release in 2013. If you have not updated since that time, you can expect some changes. The most significant changes (besides a lot of new functionality) are the simple to fix breaking changes listed below.

New in Version 2.3.0

The list of significant changes in this and previous releases can be seen in the KosherJava Zmanim API changelog.

Breaking Changes since v1.3

Rav Moshe Feinstein’s Zmanim Added to the KosherJava Zmanim API


Rav Moshe Feinstein is of the opinion that chatzos is at a fixed time all year round and is calculated based on the location’s longitude (in Lakewood, NJ it is at 11:56am / 12:56pm during DST). See Igros Moshe Orach Chaim vol 4 no. 20 for more details. The Aruch Hashulchan also calculates chatzos at a fixed time all year. Rav Moshe also bases other zmanim calculations on this fixed local chatzos. As opposed to calculating shaaos zmaniyos from beginning to the end of a day, Rav Moshe calculates a number of zmanim based on half of the day starting or ending at fixed local chatzos (see Igros Moshe Orach Chaim vol 1, no. 23). These zmanim are used in Mesivta Tiferet Yerushalayim (MTJ), Yeshiva of Staten Island and Camp Yeshiva of Staten Island. Code to calculate these Rav Moshe zmanim is now part of the latest v2.3.0 release of the KosherJava Zmanim API.
The following new zmanim are now included in the API:

Sample Usage

For developers, here is sample code that calculates the new zmanim. This should allow many zmanim apps to add Rav Moshe Feinstein’s zmanim with very little effort.

String locationName = "145 E Broadway, New York, NY";
double latitude = 40.7138;
double longitude = -73.9913;
double elevation = 11;
TimeZone timeZone = TimeZone.getTimeZone("America/New_York");
GeoLocation location = new GeoLocation(locationName, latitude, longitude, elevation, timeZone);
ComplexZmanimCalendar czc = new ComplexZmanimCalendar(location);
czc.getCalendar().set(1986, Calendar.MARCH, 23); //Rav Moshe's petirah
System.out.println("Sof zman shma alos 18° to fixed local chatzos: " + czc.getSofZmanShmaMGA18DegreesToFixedLocalChatzos());
System.out.println("Sof zman shma alos 16.1° to fixed local chatzos: " + czc.getSofZmanShmaMGA16Point1DegreesToFixedLocalChatzos());
System.out.println("Sof zman shma alos 90 to fixed local chatzos: " + czc.getSofZmanShmaMGA90MinutesToFixedLocalChatzos());
System.out.println("Sof zman shma alos 72 to fixed local chatzos: " + czc.getSofZmanShmaMGA72MinutesToFixedLocalChatzos());
System.out.println("Sof zman shma sunrise to fixed local chatzos: " + czc.getSofZmanShmaGRASunriseToFixedLocalChatzos());
System.out.println("Sof zman tfila sunrise to fixed local chatzos: " + czc.getSofZmanTfilaGRASunriseToFixedLocalChatzos());
System.out.println("Mincha gedola 30 minutes after fixed local chatzos: " + czc.getMinchaGedolaGRAFixedLocalChatzos30Minutes());
System.out.println("Mincha katana fixed local chatzos to sunset: " + czc.getMinchaKetanaGRAFixedLocalChatzosToSunset());
System.out.println("Plag hamincha fixed local chatzos to sunset: " + czc.getPlagHaminchaGRAFixedLocalChatzosToSunset());
System.out.println("Tzais 50 minutes after sunset: " + czc.getTzais50());

Calculating other fixed local chatzos based zmanim not included in the library (and not necessarily endorsed by this shitta) are very simple with the generic getFixedLocalChatzosBasedZmanim(Date startOfHalfDay, Date endOfHalfDay, double hours) method built to simplify calculating these zmanim. Here are a few examples.

//4 hours into a day based on half the day from alos 18° to fixed local chatzos
System.out.println("Sof zman tfila 18° to fixed local chatzos: " + czc.getFixedLocalChatzosBasedZmanim(getAlos18Degrees(), getFixedLocalChatzos(), 4); 
//plag hamincha based on the second half of the day starting at fixed local chatzos and ending 50 minutes after sunset
System.out.println("Plag hamincha fixed local chatzos to tzais 50 minutes: " + czc.getFixedLocalChatzosBasedZmanim(getFixedLocalChatzos(), getTzais50(), 4.75); 

I would like to thank Avraham David Gelbfish who requested this addition and provided instructions on the proper calculations used by these yeshivos in calculating the zmanim.

FAQ: Location Precision for Zmanim Calculations

While overly broad ZIP code based zmanim geolocation can be an issue in calculating zmanim accurately, going overboard in geolocation precision and accuracy for zmanim is a (harmless) waste of time.
Let’s start with the basics. Asking what the zmanim are for the USA is too broad of a location. Narrowing it down to a state is also too broad since zmanim at one side of the state are likely to be different than the other side. How small (or precise) does an area have to be for the zmanim calculated to be considered accurate? The location of zmanim are calculated based on degrees of longitude (east to west) and latitude (north to south).

The earth’s circumference at the equator is about 40,000 km (about 25,000 mi). There are 360 degrees of longitude around the world (The 0° line is centered on the Royal Greenwich Observatory in England, and longitude lines extend 180° to the west and -180° to the east). For simplicity we will deal with longitude degrees at the equator. If we divide the earth’s circumference by 360°, each degree of longitude will be 111 km (69 mi) apart. The sun’s path travels 1° of longitude in 4 minutes, so calculating zmanim with one degree accuracy (no decimal points such as the latitude of 40° and longitude of -74° for Lakewood, NJ, a point in the Atlantic about 3 mi off the coast of Toms River, NJ) results in zmanim accurate to 4 minutes in each direction or an 8 minute spread, not quite accurate enough to rely on. Moving to one decimal point will pinpoint the location for zmanim calculation to an accuracy of 11 km or 48 second accuracy. That is close to being accurate enough, especially given the inaccuracy of solar time calculations resulting from hard to predict refraction caused by varying atmospheric conditions. However, this should be avoided. Adding a second decimal point (such as the latitude of 40.09° and longitude of -74.22° for Lakewood, NJ – a spot at the edge of Lake Carasaljo in Lakewood) would have a precision of about 4 seconds, more than enough accuracy for zmanim.
A concrete example of how zmanim differ from place to place in a small area would be the difference between Beth Medrash Govoha (BMG) and the Westgate Bais Medrash in Lakewood. They are 2.7 km (1.69 mi) or a drop more than 0.01° apart and calculations show that there is about a 6 second difference in sunrise and sunset times between these two locations.

From time to time I am contacted by developers with zmanim related technical questions. Debugging their issues often requires information on the latitude and longitude that they are using to try and replicate the issue. Often the latitude and longitude are sent with multiple decimal points. The most extreme was 14 decimal points. To understand the ridiculousness of this level of precision, see the table below. To read more on the subject, see the Stack Exchange page Measuring accuracy of latitude and longitude? and the xkcd cartoon on the subject.

Decimal placesDegreesDistanceNotes
01111 kmA state or small country
10.111.1 kmCity
20.011.11 kmNeighborhood
30.001111 mA specific cul-de-sac
40.000111 mA corner of a house
50.000011.1 mA person in a room
60.00000111 cmA small siddur
70.00000011 cmThe size of Waldo on a page
80.000000011 mmA grain of sand
90.000000001111 μmThe width of a hair
100.000000000111 μmA grain of pollen
110.000000000011 μmA smoke particle
120.000000000001111 nmThe width of a COVID virus
130.000000000000111 nmA red blood cell
140.000000000000011 nmThe length your nails grow every second
150.000000000000001100 pmAn atom. If you need this precision, you probably belong in Lawrence Livermore

Taanis Bechoros Added to the KosherJava Zmanim API

Matzos
Years ago I posted the Calculating Erev Pesach Zmanim that discussed the addition of sof zman achilas chametz and sof zman biur chametz times to the API. Based on a request on the KosherJava project’s GitHub repository, a new isTaanisBechoros() method was added to the API. The Taanis Bechoros fast day usually occurs on Erev Pesach, but in years like this year (5781/2021) when Erev Pesach occurs on Shabbos, the fast is moved back to Thursday the 12th of Nissan. Erev Pesach occurs on Shabbos an average of once every 10 years. The frequency of such occurrences ranges from 3 to 20 years. It will next occur in the year 5785/2025, followed 20 years later in the year 5805/2045. The code is included in the new v2.2.0 release of the KosherJava zmanim library. The following code sample shows the basic usage of the new method.

JewishCalendar jd = new JewishCalendar();
HebrewDateFormatter hdf = new HebrewDateFormatter();
jd.setJewishDate(5781, JewishDate.NISSAN, 12);
System.out.println(jd.isTaanisBechoros());

Output:

true